Key to symbols used in gazetteer

After each duplicated place-name on this website you will find a symbol that’s there to warn you there are other places with exactly the same name:

  • (!) Alerts you to the fact that we know of at least one other place in the same country with exactly the same name, though we don’t currently list any others.
  • (!>) Alerts you to the fact that we know of at least one other place in the same country and the same region (state, county etc) with exactly the same name, though we don’t currently list any others.
  • (1) If numbered, it tells you that we do list at least one other place in that country with the same name.
  • (1>) Tells you that there is at least one other place in that region of that country with the same name, and that we do list at least one other place in the same country.

Key to abbreviations used in gazetteer

Example: Anstey, Leicestershire, =Ansty – village (pop 6k-1991) 4m/6km NW of Leicester.

  • If we know of any equivalent names, up to three of them are listed as ‘=other name’ (e.g. =Ansty).
  • Towns and villages have in some cases been provided with population figures to give an idea of the size and relative importance of the place. To save space, any place with over 750 inhabitants we round off to the nearest thousand (k)
  • The year (e.g. pop 6k-1991) is the most recent year we have reliable figures for, usually from a census.
  • Distances are stated usually in both miles (m) and kilometers (km), to the nearest larger place.
  • Simplified directions are given in terms of N (North), S (South), E (East) or W (West).
  • In some cases an altitude for the centre of the place is given in feet and/or metres (e.g. alt 123m).

Date format

As the American (Month-Day-Year) and European (Day-Month-Year) date formats are contradictory and potentially confusing, we use the International Format (Year-Month-Day)